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Q-ARI

STEPHEN RUSSELL

For the [Q] ARI. Queensland Artist-run Initiatives project, Boxcopy will present new work by Stephen Russell at the Sydney Contemporary Art Fair from 20 – 22 September, (Booth D145), at Carriage Works, Sydney. [Q] ARI features seven Queensland based ARIs selected by curators Naomi Evans and Pia Robinson. www.sydneycontemporary.com.au

Through an engagement with the decorative and the functional, Stephen Russell presents a body of new work that seeks to interrogate and challenge sets of normative values that allow objects and images to be classified as works of art. Using the vernacular of design, Russell’s works aim to embody pathos and paradox; they imply use yet continually defer it, they picture the unique artistic gesture yet attenuate it through potentially infinite digital reproduction. Russell’s decor comprises a showroom of DIY design objects in which the traditional forms of sculpture and painting are diffracted through a series of diversions and which highlight the position of the work of art within a specific field of commodification, distribution, and digitisation.

BIOGRAPHY

Stephen Russell is a Brisbane based artist, writer, and curator. Stephen holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honours from QUT and he is a founding Co-Director of Artist Run Initiative Accidentally Annie Street Space. Stephen has exhibited in Brisbane, and nationally including solo exhibitions at Boxcopy Contemporary Art Space, QUT Art Museum and Metro Arts, and as part of the 2012 Next Wave Festival in Melbourne. He is a two time finalist of the Churchie National Emerging Art Award, receiving a Judges Commendation. In 2009 Stephen took part in Ryan Renshaw Gallery’s best of graduates show Test Pattern and was awarded Metro Arts Artist in Residence. This year, Stephen was profiled in the ‘Undiscovered’ issue of Art Collector, and was the Visual Arts co-curator of the Brisbane Emerging Arts Festival.

www.stephenrussell.com.au

Image: Stephen Russell Untitled (decor) 2013. Courtesy the artist.


brisbane-miracle---lost-in-translation

BROOKE FERGUSON

For the second part of [Q] ARI. Queensland Artist-run Initiatives project, Boxcopy will present new work by Brooke Ferguson at the Griffith University Art Gallery from 5 October – 16 November 2013.

Brooke Ferguson’s text based installation The Brisbane Miracle (lost in translation), looks back into the rich history of women artists who work with language – but are very rarely recognised. This work is made up of texts selected from writings made by largely unrecognised female artists of the time. These women were centrally involved, or even preceded, the ambitions of Dada and Fluxus artists, but are conspicuously absent from the history of modern art. Through translating, extending and re-presenting these texts, Ferguson is concerned with how this content from the past operates in the present. The work also obliquely plays with Hans Ulrich Obrist’s idea of identifying the space of creative ‘Miracles.’ These being spaces of unique and new creativity (in this case Brisbane) – along with a sideways glance at Bill Murray, or perhaps more importantly, Sofia Coppola.

BIOGRAPHY

Brooke Ferguson is a Brisbane based artist. She completed her Bachelor of Fine Art (Visual Arts) with Honours at the Queensland University of Technology in 2010. She was awarded Artist in Residence at Metro Arts, Brisbane in 2011. Working across a variety of media, her practice explores an extended model of drawing to encompass sound, text, object based and performative works. Employing play, humour, and economical gestures as strategies to make art, her practice investigates notions of feminism, regionalism, and art as a socially engaged activity. Ferguson has exhibited with Accidentally Annie Street, Boxcopy, inbetweenspaces, Inflight, LEVEL, and No Frills* ARI.

Image: Brooke Ferguson The Brisbane Miracle (lost in translation) 2013. Courtesy the artist.

Q ARI has received financial assistance from the Queensland Government through Arts Queensland. Supported by Griffith University Art Gallery, Queensland College of Art, Griffith University.